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» Youth Soccer Discussions » General Discussions » 2013 Committments << Older Newer >>
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soccerwest February 12th, 2013 20:04 GMT Print this post
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Stanford.  Most families would love for their dds to attend Stanford but the reality is many will not be admitted even with outstanding credentials.  

So that leaves the following CA D1 schools,

4.0 average gpa ( Cal, UCLA, Irvine, UC Davis, USC)
3.8 average gpa (UC Santa Barbara)

3.6-3.8 average gpa (Santa Clara, UOP, St Mary's San Diego State, Cal Poly, U of San Diego, Loyola, Pepperdine)

3.4-3.5 average gpa (San Jose state, Long Beach, Fullerton, USF)

Time to hit the books!




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soccerwest February 12th, 2013 20:15 GMT Print this post
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And some D2 schools that are a bit easier to get in to:

Around 3.0-3.2 GPA (sfsu, calm state east bay, sac St. And other cal states)
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Hooked002 February 12th, 2013 20:19 GMT Print this post
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Quoted from: 92admin, February 12th, 2013 06:53  GMT
Hooked002: I've heard of players decommitting but never a school doing so. . . . I'd be curious to hear stories to the contrary.

Mostly, what I'm thinking about is the HS junior commits when the coach is fired or resigns.  My guess is that most schools usually will honor the verbal commitment to the HS seniors, but won't want to tie the hands of the new coach as to recruiting the next class out (i.e., the current HS juniors and sophomores).  Of course, the new coach might want some (or all) of the juniors and sophomores, but that's not the same as honoring a previous non-binding commitment.
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Hooked002 February 12th, 2013 21:44 GMT Print this post
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Minimum admissions standards are not static.  They may not change much year-to-year, but sometimes they change radically, especially with respect to athletes.  For example, one could make a case that Stanford's return to football glory was as much about changing the Deam of Admissions in 2005 as it was to hiring coach Harbaugh in 2006.    

A coach's ability to influence admission decisions is also not static.  An established coach is more likely to understand what is possible from admissions than a new coach.  

So, not only is each school unique, but predictability can be difficult.  All one can do is listen to what the coach tells you is needed in terms of grades, classes, scores and hope they are right.  As folks who have been through the process can attest, while there is lots of similarity, there are meaningful differences in what the bottom line will be even at similarly situated schools.  

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Lets Play Soccer February 12th, 2013 22:11 GMT Print this post
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So I've just heard a Sophomore that has verbally committed to a school. But what does that mean? What if as above that coach is fired or moves on? Is the verbal with the coach or the school.? 2 years in a commitment is a long time and grades could drop, or god forbid an injury.  

Also what if after 2 years that school doesn't have the program the kid is interested in?  


Some people believe football is a matter of life and death. I'm very disappointed with that attitude. I can assure you it is much, much more important than that."- Bill Shankly
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eastbaysoccer February 13th, 2013 17:42 GMT Print this post
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Verbal commitments are made to be broken.  Get it in writing signed with and injury clause.


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Far Post February 13th, 2013 18:20 GMT Print this post
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The rules don't allow written agreements until February of senior year.  The national letter of intent signing day for the class of 2013 was last week (hence this thread).

So all you can get is a verbal agreement between the player and coach.  And they are usually reliable.  There are some exceptions apparently, but they are relatively infrequent.  

If you don't trust the coach, then don't verbally commit to that coach.  If you decide to not trust any of them, then you may lose the chance to be on the list for the school of your choice because the coach will simply get other players to commit.  And if your school of choice is both a top soccer program and top academic institution, then you can replace "may" in the preceding sentence with "will".  There may be exceptions that also, but if you are good enough to merit such an exception, then you won't need to worry about the coach reneging anyway.  

This system is not perfect, but it is a pretty effective method for the coaches and players to sort out who is playing where in advance of the official signing day.  

You can view it almost like a draft process in pro sports, except that the good teams choose first and the players can choose to accept or not.  The really good teams and schools get first choice of interested players; then the next best teams and players connect; then the next and so on.  Using the Northern California schools as an example, you will generally see Stanford and Cal fill their verbal commit list very early, some other schools will be a little later and the least attractive programs may finish their class very late, even after the signing day.
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eastbaysoccer February 13th, 2013 18:50 GMT Print this post
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Quoted from: Far Post, February 13th, 2013 18:20  GMT
The rules don't allow written agreements until February of senior year.  The national letter of intent signing day for the class of 2013 was last week (hence this thread).

So all you can get is a verbal agreement between the player and coach.  And they are usually reliable.  There are some exceptions apparently, but they are relatively infrequent.  

If you don't trust the coach, then don't verbally commit to that coach.  If you decide to not trust any of them, then you may lose the chance to be on the list for the school of your choice because the coach will simply get other players to commit.  And if your school of choice is both a top soccer program and top academic institution, then you can replace "may" in the preceding sentence with "will".  There may be exceptions that also, but if you are good enough to merit such an exception, then you won't need to worry about the coach reneging anyway.  

This system is not perfect, but it is a pretty effective method for the coaches and players to sort out who is playing where in advance of the official signing day.  

You can view it almost like a draft process in pro sports, except that the good teams choose first and the players can choose to accept or not.  The really good teams and schools get first choice of interested players; then the next best teams and players connect; then the next and so on.  Using the Northern California schools as an example, you will generally see Stanford and Cal fill their verbal commit list very early, some other schools will be a little later and the least attractive programs may finish their class very late, even after the signing day.


yikes.  So these colleges are so certain on these young players they are willing to commit so early!  Wow.


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92admin February 13th, 2013 20:07 GMT Print this post
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This message was edited by 92admin on February 13th, 2013 20:08 GMT

I'm surprised to hear of someone verbally committed in their sophomore year. Our daughter first met with her eventual college team in September of her junior year in high school and was verbally committed by December of that year. We had to initiate contact with the coach and he was very clear on the communication limitations. KeeperDad probably has outlined those rules in his write up. Can't say I remember all of them but we were pretty careful to play by the rules at the time.

It was my understanding that contact and verbal agreements could not occur before the junior year. However, since such agreements are verbal and not written, I guess we shouldn't be surprised that people flout the rules. After all, if a kid wants to go to a certain school and that school wants her on their team, you can see the rationale for both sides to get some security as early as possible. I'm not saying I agree with it, but I think I can understand the psychology behind it.

Heck, the parents of one of my daughter's soccer peers once claimed their daughter was "verbally committed" to a team when she was in eighth grade! I thought it was ridiculous at the time but who knows what kind of conversation they had with the coach. In any case, she did not end up attending that school so the validity of their claim is questionable.
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Hooked002 February 13th, 2013 20:13 GMT Print this post
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Quoted from: eastbaysoccer, February 13th, 2013 18:50  GMT
yikes.  So these colleges are so certain on these young players they are willing to commit so early!  Wow.

Odds are that, if they coach is uncertain, there is no early verbal.  While coaches are willing to gamble that a player will change an early verbal commitment, I don't believe they're willing to gamble early that a player has the ability to perform at the school's level of play.
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